Junto March Madness: Round 1, Day 2 Voting (Brackets 3 and 4)

If ranking historical primary sources is exciting to you, head over to @thejuntoblog ‘s March Madness tournament.

The Junto

JMM15Today we commence with voting on Round 1, brackets 3 and 4. As a reminder, you can find the entire bracket here. Again, we’ve included arguments on behalf of various documents, written by either Junto bloggers or friends of the blog. Please feel free to add your arguments in the comments, because the purpose of this month’s “tournament” is to provide a resource for teachers of early American history.

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Modernity Disavowed: Haiti and the Cultures of Slavery in the Age of Revolution

Fischer, Sibylle. 2004. Modernity disavowed: Haiti and the cultures of slavery in the age of revolution. Durham: Duke University Press.

Fischer, Sibylle. 2004. Modernity disavowed: Haiti and the cultures of slavery in the age of revolution. Durham: Duke University Press.

Look at the sister post.

Sibylle Fischer’s book, Modernity Disavowed, is for the long distances. At eleven years after its publication in 2004, it is still a force in the field, shaping discussions, and inspiring articles, books and dissertations. It is not a historical monograph per se. Instead, it is an intellectual work that draws from literature, history, philosophy and psychoanalysis (some reviewers have pointed out that it relies on history more than on other disciplines).  It also uses a transnational approach to tackling hard questions about the post-revolutionary period in three major Caribbean nations: Haiti, Cuba and the Dominican Republic. Emancipation and nation-building are the book’s major concerns.  A scholarly exchange (in Spanish) over the book, which was published in the Caribbean Studies, 33:2 (Jul. – Dec., 2005), had Clevis Headley and Neil Roberts raising questions about the issues of “Modernity” and “Disavowed,” and then Fischer was invited to respond.

Read an interview that Gina Ulysse gave to Fischer.

Toussaint Louverture's 1801 Constitution consacrated.

Le 1er. Juillet 1801, Toussaint-L’Ouverture, chargés des pouvoirs du peuple d’Haïty et auspices du Tout-puissante, proclame la Gouverneur général, assisté des mandataires légalement convoqués, en présence et sous les Constitution de la république d’Haïty / lith. de Villain, r. de Sèvres No. 11.

Bibliography:

Fischer, Sibylle. 2004. Modernity Disavowed: Haiti and the cultures of slavery in the age of revolution. Durham: Duke University Press.

Two chapters available online:

Chapter 11

Chapter 13

Other reviews

David Geggus

Ashli White

Robert Lawless

Kenneth Maxwell

Kaiama L. Glover

Sarah Franklin

James Tredwell, and the 1816 Haitian (published in NY in 1818)

James Tredwell, and the 1816 Haitian (published in NY in 1818)

James Tredwell translation of the 1816 Haitian Constitution, which includes the letter Joseph Inginac wrote inviting U.S. Blacks to settle in Haiti-- the first of its kind.

James Tredwell translation of the 1816 Haitian Constitution, which includes the letter Joseph Inginac wrote inviting U.S. Blacks to settle in Haiti– the first of its kind.

Join us here: Zotero Mendeley

One of the first documents we include in our bibliography is a copy of the 1816 Haitian Republican Constitution; also known as the Pétion’s Constitution. If we admit this document in our bibliography, we should also include Ada Ferrer’s article, which centers on the impact this new body of laws had in attracting People of Color from the Caribbean to Haiti. In my book, In Search of an American Dream, I address the other side of this effect: how James Tredwell “smuggled” a copy of this constitution to the U.S, translated it and published it. He also made sure that the newspapers would pick up the news about his publication. So, we should also include here, at least, one of the papers that reblogged Tredwell’s news.

Major Antilles with highlight of haiti

The Major Antilles with highlight of Haiti

James Tredwell published the first Haitian Constitution to become widely known in the U.S., just about two years after Prince Saunders published the Haytian Papers in London. Saunders’ work were similar documents but from the Northern Haitian kingdom of Henri Christophe.   Saunders will republish them in the U.S., but weeks after Tredwell published the papers and Constitution he brought from Southern Haiti. Saunders’ work deserve its own space, so we are here focusing only on Tredwell.

Click here for an expanded post on Tredwell.

If interested in developing your bibliography and helping us grow ours, join us in Zotero or Mendeley

The WorldCat bibliographic information:

Haiti, Fontanges, and Esmangart. The Constitution of the Republic of Hayti To Which Is Added Documents Relating to the Correspondence of His Most Christian Majesty with the President of Hayti: Preceded by a Proclamation to the People and the Army. New-York: James Tredwell, 1818.

Library of Congress: http://lccn.loc.gov/76373969

It is available for download here:

From the Biblioteca Digital Del Caribe: http://bit.ly/1DAeQy9

In Haitian Vodou, Papa Legba is the loa who serves as the intermediary between the loa and humanity.

In Haitian Vodou, Papa Legba is the loa who serves as the intermediary between the loa and humanity.

Wikicommons: http://bit.ly/1wN3aJC

And in Scribdhttps://www.scribd.com/doc/306259801/

And of course, we have a copy in our bibliography too.

Here is the link to the City of Washington Gazette, which reblogged the news from the Boston Centinel: City of Washington Gazette; Date- 10-13-1818; http://bit.ly/13hsUlb 

The following works have given some space to Tredwell’s story.

Ferrer, Ada. 2012. “Haiti, Free Soil, and Antislavery in the Revolutionary Atlantic”. The American Historical Review. 117, no. 1: 40-66. http://bit.ly/1DAfmML

Power-Greene, Ousmane K. Against Wind and Tide: The African American Struggle against the Colonization Movement. 2014. http://bit.ly/1p4M1ca

Fanning, Sara C. “The Roots of Early Black Nationalism: Northern African Americans’ Invocations of Haiti in the Early Nineteenth Century.” Slavery and Abolition 28, no. 1 (2007): 61-85.

Pamphile Miller, Chrislaine. ”’Blessed Are the Peacemakers’: African American Emigration to Haiti, 1816-1826.” Diss. Santa Cruz, 2013.  http://bit.ly/1wN4pbW