West African Warfare in Bahia and Cuba | CLACS | NYU

West African Warfare in Bahia and Cuba: Soldier Slaves in the Atlantic World, 1807-1844

West African Warfare in Bahia and Cuba seeks to explain how a series of historical events that occurred in West Africa from the mid-1790s— including Afonja’s rebellion, the Owu wars, the Fulani-ledjihad, and the migrations to Egbaland—had an impact upon life in cities and plantations in western Cuba and Bahia. Manuel Barcia examines the extent to which a series of African-led plots and armed movements that took place in western Cuba and Bahia between 1807 and 1844 were the result—or a continuation—of events that had occurred in and around the Yoruba and Hausa kingdoms in the same period.
Why did these two geographical areas serve as the theatre for the uprising of the Nagos, the Lucumis, and other West African men and women? The answer, Barcia argues, relates to the fact that plantation economies supported by unusually large numbers of African-born slaves from the same—or close— geographical and ethnic heritage, which transformed the rural and urban landscape in western Cuba and Bahia. To understand why these two areas followed such similar social patterns it is essential to look across the Atlantic—it is not enough to repeat the significance of the African background of Bahian and Cuban slaves. By establishing connections between people and events, with a special emphasis on their warfare experiences, Barcia presents a coherent narrative which spans more than three decades and opens a wealth of archival research for future study.

– See more at: http://clacs.as.nyu.edu/object/clacs.events.special.040115#sthash.4lVRxEGk.dpuf

West African Warfare in Bahia and Cuba: Soldier Slaves in the Atlantic World, 1807-1844

West African Warfare in Bahia and Cuba seeks to explain how a series of historical events that occurred in West Africa from the mid-1790s— including Afonja’s rebellion, the Owu wars, the Fulani-ledjihad, and the migrations to Egbaland—had an impact upon life in cities and plantations in western Cuba and Bahia. Manuel Barcia examines the extent to which a series of African-led plots and armed movements that took place in western Cuba and Bahia between 1807 and 1844 were the result—or a continuation—of events that had occurred in and around the Yoruba and Hausa kingdoms in the same period.
Why did these two geographical areas serve as the theatre for the uprising of the Nagos, the Lucumis, and other West African men and women? The answer, Barcia argues, relates to the fact that plantation economies supported by unusually large numbers of African-born slaves from the same—or close— geographical and ethnic heritage, which transformed the rural and urban landscape in western Cuba and Bahia. To understand why these two areas followed such similar social patterns it is essential to look across the Atlantic—it is not enough to repeat the significance of the African background of Bahian and Cuban slaves. By establishing connections between people and events, with a special emphasis on their warfare experiences, Barcia presents a coherent narrative which spans more than three decades and opens a wealth of archival research for future study.

– See more at: http://clacs.as.nyu.edu/object/clacs.events.special.040115#sthash.4lVRxEGk.dpuf

Book talk for those in the NYC neighborhood (not fair for those exiled to the US country side):

West African Warfare in Bahia and Cuba: Soldier Slaves in the Atlantic World, 1807-1844

West African Warfare in Bahia and Cuba: Soldier Slaves in the Atlantic World, 1807-1844 - See more at: http://clacs.as.nyu.edu/object/clacs.events.special.040115#sthash.4lVRxEGk.dpuf

Manuel Barcia

West African Warfare in Bahia and Cuba: Soldier Slaves in the Atlantic World, 1807-1844

West African Warfare in Bahia and Cuba seeks to explain how a series of historical events that occurred in West Africa from the mid-1790s— including Afonja’s rebellion, the Owu wars, the Fulani-ledjihad, and the migrations to Egbaland—had an impact upon life in cities and plantations in western Cuba and Bahia. Manuel Barcia examines the extent to which a series of African-led plots and armed movements that took place in western Cuba and Bahia between 1807 and 1844 were the result—or a continuation—of events that had occurred in and around the Yoruba and Hausa kingdoms in the same period.
Why did these two geographical areas serve as the theatre for the uprising of the Nagos, the Lucumis, and other West African men and women? The answer, Barcia argues, relates to the fact that plantation economies supported by unusually large numbers of African-born slaves from the same—or close— geographical and ethnic heritage, which transformed the rural and urban landscape in western Cuba and Bahia. To understand why these two areas followed such similar social patterns it is essential to look across the Atlantic—it is not enough to repeat the significance of the African background of Bahian and Cuban slaves. By establishing connections between people and events, with a special emphasis on their warfare experiences, Barcia presents a coherent narrative which spans more than three decades and opens a wealth of archival research for future study.

– See more at: http://clacs.as.nyu.edu/object/clacs.events.special.040115#sthash.4lVRxEGk.dpuf

– See more at: http://clacs.as.nyu.edu/object/clacs.events.special.040115#sthash.4lVRxEGk.dpuf

West African Warfare in Bahia and Cuba | CLACS | NYU.

Wednesday, April 1st, 2015, 12:30 p.m.
Location: KJCC room 607, 53 Washington Square South, New York, 10012 (map)

Genocide, Narrative, and Indigenous Exile from the Caribbean Archipelago

Newton On the importance of The Carib-Garifuna survival

CLACS @ NYU

Melanie NewtonThis spring’s colloquium series Whither the Caribbean? Critical Perspectives on History, Politics, and Culture opened with a talk by Melanie Newton, Associate Professor of History at the University of Toronto.  Newton specializes in the social and cultural history of the Caribbean and the history of slavery, gender, and emancipation in the Atlantic World.

Newton presented her paper “The Race Leapt at Sauteurs”: Genocide, Narrative, and Indigenous Exile from the Caribbean Archipelago, which explores the history of Garifuna people (Afro-indigenous descendants of the people of the ‘Caribbee’ islands) between 1492 and the eighteenth century. Her objective was to demonstrate that the Lesser Antilles’s histories of enslavement and colonization fit the 1951 United Nations definition of genocide as an attempt to “destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnic, racial or religious group.” To do so, she took into account three acts of annihilationist violence committed by the Spanish in…

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